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have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
and technology and invention and art and science come which no other primate has done. very simple example of primates creating tools for using language, but it was indefinitely expandable hierarchical fashion. >> host: so you're thinking of the main functions of the neo cortex has been this high-level functions such as decision-making, inhibiting and proper actions. i mean, the neo cortex is a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high on both levels and uses the same algorithm. i've recognized the ages of objects for crossfires ofa and obvious functions that he got at the high-level, how to recognize and say she's pretty but that was funny. it exists at the highest level of the conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out was what happens to be one, a region of the neo cortex of the optic nerve stillson, generally the process is a very primitive pattern and images, like the ages of objects. so this low-level, simple patterns. what happens to it and it congenitally blind person? it actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help that pro
or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
scores and the amnt of time spept in the classroom. not in math or science or in anything. u.s. students spend more time in the class rom than kid in the chin affin land and japan. that helps one person and that ishe teacher unions where the recip yepts of the spending. if you want to help the kids privatize the system. before the late 1880s it was home schooled and private and more choice and better o come for all. >> john, is it worth it or the education of the kids is worth it? >> i don't think there is a correlation. i think johnathon is right here. i don't agree with privatization of all schools. 20 years we had a best education system . we still have great teachers and school accident, but as a system, we are failing and we are falling down behind other countries. you look at oecd inwe are falling back every year. it is not the amount much time, it is what they are getting while they are there. and we don't have the ability to merit base teacher or students and we have a problem of the infrastructure. >> christian, what about the economics of all of we know that stes are trugling a
in the last five years. >> well, there have been major events. what's unusual about this event in science history is it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. it's not one technology. it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, your entire genome profile in a few hours with a few hundred dollars which took billions of dollars and a decade. we have the ability to analyze those data through very statistical computations structures and artificial intelligence. >> so if i look at it. you show me a machine that now sequences dnas, the size of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than -- much more powerful than a machine five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days, a 24/7 run, one machine could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the u.s. in the year 2007. >> you also talk about how computing has become not only faster but much more sophisticat sophisticated. >> the most exciting is artificial intelligence. we're a third artificial intelligence where computers can think. they can think in a text real way where computers can help us make d
? >> there have been major events and what's unusual about this period in science history is that it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. so it's not one technology, it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, the entire tumor profile in a few hours for a few hundred dollars what took billions of dollars and a decde aid, question have the -- >> if i look at just to understand that advance in computing. you showed me a machine that now sequences dna, it's the side of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than, much more powerful than a machine just five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days a 24/7 run, one machine, could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the united states in the year 2007. >> you also talked about how computing has become just faster, but much more sophisticated. >> we're now a third generation artificial intelligence where computers can think, they can actually think in a con tech churl way which allows us to make decisions based on vast amounts of information. game changing. >> i think we all understand, at least i t
health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will
is my wonderful co-authored it is a professor to of political science and political philosophy and art. many years ago when we were both at princeton university week co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to as co-operate several books on deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, you give it to legislate examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> so this is a tale of two compromises. and it begins with ronald reagan presidency where tax reform was a huge and important issue and a hugely difficult issue to get done between the republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognizes that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch little too liberal democrat and reagan's staunch conservative republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise. part of the movers of that compromise. test for to the affordable care act. it ven more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign and helped not just pol
it but science are money are intertwined, the threat of budget sequestration makes this clearer than ever if. u.s. falls over the fiscal cliff $2.5 million could be slurred from the budget. economics influences everything from the types of questions researchers ask to the quantity and quality of scientists who conduct research. in her book how economic shapes science georgia state university economist paula stephan argues --
to be. whatever, science, history will all be harder. maybe you get to nap without reading and maybe not. if your kids can't read well, some of them will not get through high school. if your kids can't read well, choices and opportunities in life will be limited. they're not going to have as many choices. but the cool thing about looks, the great and terrific thing is there's so many really good books out there for them to read. there's a lot of books that will absolutely blow the minds of your kid. you know, harry potter, terrific series. when the kids come and terrific illustrations. books about sports, fine. if you have boys, let them read anything. , looks, great, graphic novels, almanacs, cut books, share, why not. as long as they are reading because to get better at it. i'll go to schools and say who play soccer? who love soccer? the outcome of the. you better know? would play a lot. same with reading. he read more, get better at it. it gets easier. you read better books. you have something that you love. so i though the will to get that in your hands that notion we read in our hou
you look there's something to do, something to find. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? >> not much, but my son has so much fun exploring he doesn't lielz his little brain is working too. ann clair stapleton, cnn, atlanta. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. >>> welcome back. time now for some arts and leisure. nadia bilchik joins me again. nadia, for this week's segment you had an opportunity to speak with a woman with kati marton about her book. she was married to peter jennings and the late ambassador peter holbrooke. i asked her why now is the time to write her memoir. >> i wanted to make something permanent out of what turned out to be impermanent, that is my 1
. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they have led to charges that that anger the democratic base. will that be the basis of your message to unseating some of those governors? >> here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that with out pres
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
in the journal environmental science and technology found stuffing in more than 100 sophomore f hu00 the country found that 85% contained potentially hazard downs chemicals. >> they're coming out of the couches into air and dropping into dust. >> reporter: these chemicals were first used to meet requirements in california saying that the upholstery must sustain a flame for 15 seconds. among the chemicals found where were pbdes, voluntarily phased out in 2004 after the epa expressed concern that they were toxic to both humans and the environment. and a toxic ban from children's sleep wear in the 1970s. an environmental advocacy group found the tests it commissioned found high levels of tris in 16 upholstered products. but the midwesteamerican chemis counsel say that it provides time -- a furniture trade group says it's not aware of any evidence including in the sofa study linking the retard ands in furniture as a home health problem. additional research is needed for the sole purpose of meeting california's strict standards. the treadway's say for them, finding this ecofriendly douch was worth it
and science editor reviews how young women may put themselves in harm's way. >> reporter: it's convenient say many young women. >> it's probably the most convenient place to put it especially when you go out. you put your money on one breast and the phone in the other. >> it's easy to feel the vibration and someone texts you, you can get the call really fast. >> reporter: maybe they should talk to tiffany france. her mother had misgivings. >> we never took it seriously until after she was diagnosed. >> reporter: tiffany got breast cancer at 21. >> it just so happened her tumors were exactly where her cell phone had been against her skin, her bare skin for about six years. >> reporter: surgeons removed tiffany's left breast. >> it's kind of coincidental it's right where i kept my cell phone are. >> reporter: the dots are where her humors developed and the doctor says it exactly matched her cell phone. this image shows the tumors were just under the surface of her skin. >> all in this area right here. which is where i tuck my cell phone. >> reporter: jane said she did that for ten years.
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. let's find out if we have got anything wrong so far. for that we go to tv's andy levy. joy do you have your -- >> do you have your bus there? >> it is my cat. >> i don't think so. >> it is my cat. >> it is a bus. >> i see a cat. >> i believe you do. >> i do. i see a cat. >> i don't think you are lying. >> i wonder what your cats look like, andy? >> not like that. >> i'm afraid. >> and you will never find out. students pushing for divest meant. ambassador, you said if they don't like endowments, let them pay a higher tuition. okay, i agree. but let me be a little con terror yen. contrarian, aren't colleges supposed to do things like this? >> from you asking if they are supposed to act in an immature way, then yes, it fits into that. >> all right. >> that's it? >> i just feel like maybe in college you are supposed to do things like this. >> it is a possibility. >> you know by saying this -- >> we will get to that later. >> andy happened to do the
ahead. >> reporter: this political science professor at uw called this an interesting bind for the president, saying my crens is they will look the other way, but find a couple high profile people who are well beyond the bounds of our new law and bust them, but leave everyone else completely alone. if that happens, the target could be on frank snarr, but he thinks he's just the first and more private smoking rooms will soon pop up. >> and more power to them. if they can raise revenue for the state, that's what it's all about. that's what we're in business for. >> now, the bar owner stresses the buying or selling of marijuana inside his club is strictly prohibited. >>> well, still ahead this morning, as fighting continues in syria, a new move by rebel forces to improve coordination could bring on support from the united states. >> and in london, more backlash over the death of a nurse who fell victim to a radio show prank. find out what people are saying the radio host should do now. we'll be right back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all.
. >> economics, science of explaining where all the money went. the field of economics is divided into two main categories , microeconomics with examines why stephanie was here a minute ago and macro, with such a the economy as a whole to determine have that much money can this be done . analyzed it to study wine making money to replace the money the disappeared is not going to work. the best course of action is to reject the idea that the money is really down and carry on like nothing happened. other theories argued the only way to fix this is-the people at the most money to share with everyone else. except that money is never coming back and everybody pantages to use to it. >> bill clinton. let's do it. >> bill clinton, 42nd president of the united states his popular appeal nearly provoked house republicans to impeach him for conduct in his personal life, an unprecedented move that would have made a mockery of the u.s. constitution and was therefore quickly dismissed as a level with the time. a self-described new democrat he sets his policies would have been only the second president to face
and health sciences. >> we are in the university of albany's department of special collections and archives, and what are the main depositor on campus for collecting archival records, historical records, primary sources that are used by students, teachers, scholars, journalists and many other folks. >> a national death penalty archive was started here at the university of albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the archivist it ended special collections and archives and faculty members of the school. there's no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organizations for the ideas that spring the debate that goes on, both in the legal arena and political agreement over the the death penalty. what i want to show you from the national death penalty archive today is a collection from a
we miss the mark, we have got to study this. we have got to make it a discipline of science and say how can we look at this like we look at cancer? where are the cracks? where the mistakes? that was the main reason i decided to go down this path. >> host: that statistic of 30% in quality, waste and variability is a stunning statistic. why do you think that, and you mentioned culture a little while ago. what is it about the culture of health care, where those types of activities have been allowed to go on for such a length of time. if you look at any other industry, 30% waste or 30% error rate really would be unacceptable. how does that occur within health care? >> you know it's a great wondered why people tolerate 30% waste and health care but they wouldn't tolerated in any other industry. i saw a statistic recently in a report, the average income of an american in the united states gone up about 30% over the last decade. the increase in health care costs that they are paying have gone up about 68% over the same time period. essentially we have offset the increases in income with in
returning home to hina. lou: democrats to feed the stamp act, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. immigrants into this country who deserve it and to we desperately want to have your while we throw open our borders and our airports to people whoare, for the most part, the majority of those illegal immigrants are not even high-school eucated, lacks skills, like education. my god. d they do so rejecting that law, that bill andprevent it from becoming law because they want to have a lottery. for crying out loud. the absurdities compound themselves. >> in generawe have t recognize that the individual entrepreneur with special sklls and contributions to american produce all the jobs, and they are the ones who are getting rich, who are punished by any increase in marginal tax rates. the already rich -- lou: what abou the young man or woman in this country who is not an entrepreneur, is not a big shot, is not in middle management in a big corporation. they won a break. they wo an opportunity. they want to live the american dream. why can't the republicans talk to them? >
. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done. what it free men and women can achieve when imagination joins a common purpose. host: his inaugural address from january 2009. the question is, as the president moves to a second term, what is your number one priority? the number one agenda item you think he needs to address? danny is joining us from west virginia on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the first issue and the core of all of our problems is the free trade we have been engaging in for the last 20 years. if you look at the jobs numbers and how long it takes to recover from the sessions, the clear issue is our jobs have
. >> or single-pane windows that make the classrooms saunas in the summer and freezers in the winter. science teacher hugh hunter says it hinders learning. >> as kids go from classroom to classroom they experience the same situation and after three or four hours of that it's hard for them to focus. >> lawmakers just introduced measures to get project moneys out the door by next summer. retrofitting is expected to cut energy costs at least 30%. >> we want to give them great, new energy efficiency and clean energy technologies and bring our schools up to the 21st century. when the upgrading is done, the $4 billion goes to the state's general fund. in sacramento, nannette miranda, abc7 news. >>> muni officials are hoping san francisco cable cars will be running smoothly today without any more problems. a series of glitches forced closers the past two days. service was shut down friday and after repairs were made to the cables, service resumed yesterday morning. but then around 8:30 the powell mason and powell height lines went down. the mta is blaming equipment issues for both disruptions. >> ju
, the science experiments and such that we do on the international space station? are we in good shape to stay ahead of the curve? or do you think we are falling behind? >> no. i think we are way ahead of the curve. not only do we have the international space station, but there is a tremendous amount of private initiative that is going on in space now. it's a more exciting time. i think than i have ever seen in space. principally because we have private industry, i'm part of a nonprofit organization, putting a telescope into space. i mean, there is a tremendous amount of individual initiative and private initiative that the u.s. is leading on. >> jamie: you are tracking asteroids. >> i have been working protecting the earth from asteroid impacts for 10 or 15 years. right now, we have developed the capability to deflect an asteroid, if it is heading for earth. what we are doing now is putting up a telescope in order to provide good, early morning. -- warning. so it's eye a very exciting time. we have private people, flying supplies back and forth to the international space station. a recent ann
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> the headlines on friday looked great. unemployment rate drops to 7.7%. 146,000 americans score new jobs, but those headlines don't tell the whole story. christine romans is here to share the breakdown of that report. >> let's go beyond the headline and look deep inside these numbers at say the unemployment rate. the underemployment rate. 41.1% of people out of work have been out of work for six months or longer. that starts to become a real big problem for the economy when these people are left behind. underemployment still high. 14.4%. some call this the real unemployment rate. it's almost double what that headline number is. another big problem. let's look in the sectors that are hiring. retail jobs. 53,000. all of those retailers hiring up for the holiday season, but many of those jobs are temporary and it's kind of hard to send a kid to college on the -- many of those retail jobs and there aren't always benefits. some place where they are benefits if you look into these numbers, you can see tha
? >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern but a lot of curiosity. >> yeah, it was going so fast, it actually gets through the atmosphere, that makes the flow. >> reporter: the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. fit meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail? did it actually move? did it change color? did it move from east to west? >> reporter: a lot of scientists searching for explanation to what's called the fireball over texas, a lot of people who aren't scientists as well. >> i've heard so many different things about, you know, 2012. so it's kind of scary because it's getting closer to that day. >> a nasa expert says it may have been a meteor. national weather service says it was probably just space junk. there you go. >>> his architectural masterpieces speak for themselves. oscar niedermayer's spread across the country of brazil. next why his legacy will go on long after his death. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in americ
was allowed to travel abroad and he went to berkeley to study clinical sciences and 18-year-old unfair to oxford in 1970 was then returned to pakistan he began to work as a lawyer, that he began to make his name in karachi circles at least. he married -- you pretty merit rather my grandmother. it was a love marriage and their parents oppose. they'll vote. >> your family has to rein in marriage? >> yes, they had lived in bombay and had come over during partition and she was from a shia family, so they didn't quite like the sound of that. svea loped and married and their first child was born soon after. a year after that another daughter followed was quite soon after that but he began his career in politics. >> and he was executed in what year? >> in 1979. >> so your father was at what age when his father was executed? >> he was 25 when his father was killed. the government has been overthrown two years before that when my father was 23 and financier would have been 24. they spent two years fighting for clemency for their father. the two sons traveled all over the world, including to ame
chief science correspondence robert bazel has the story. >> reporter: with the season starting early, children's hospital in memphis is feeling the first wave. >> we've seen more than 200 cases of flu in the hospital this week and we're admitting eight to ten kids a day. we expect it to accelerate, to get worse before it gets better in the next few weeks. >> reporter: schoolchildren are not only vulnerable, they play a big role in spreading the flu. >> when you have all those kids getting together, they tend to pass the virus back and forth, they all get sick in the school and bring it home into the community. >> the way to protect those people is to vaccinate the people around them. so vaccinating more children reduces the risk of older people in the community of getting the flu. >> reporter: health officials are urging everyone, adults and children over 6 months old, to get vaccinated, and officials emphasized there's plenty to go around and it's never too late to get it. for "today," robert bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next on "today," hear why one washington lawmakers wants
choosing your capitalist. there was one of those typical, business and social science. one of those typical varieties of capitalism's. they have a nicer capitalism in the street. we have a more rampant cowboy capitalist. and a very myopic kind of discussion because it failed to see the extent to which european capitalism has become so americanized. you know, the european union is more open, if anything, to much of what we have been discussing in terms of free capital flows and deregulation than any other. so it has been in myopic discussion. but i think everyone now does recognize this is the capitol system. and hopefully people will get beyond looking for a better variety of capitalism and use the kind of democratizing language your speaking of to try to get to somewhere else. get to a better society that is not structured in terms of capitalist social relations and the drive to capital. >> do things. [inaudible] agreed to help and to privatize so that they stand aside. create our own. [indiscernible] >> yes. i think a central theme of the book is, to some extent, the type of reforms. for
impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you have set an example. our country has to be prepared to protect its supporters whether it is from the military or other kinds of encouragement or as the establishment of a program that says if you build and live here, that your route should not be taken away from you without the government helping to restore things. one of the questions i thought about when i heard you had this assignment is how much you had to do with this. it may take a long time to solve the problem. we commend you for your work. ad
in an edition of popular science that there was an experimental program called the invisible i and it was a program that was a precursor to the contact lenses. so he got on the train, went into new york and got enrolled in the program and got his set of invisible eyes. so he went to the recruiting station and watched how they did the examination. he watched the navy and the navy had one line. he would go down the line and get your physical exam. he would get your psychological exam and then your eye exam. then he watched the coast guard and the coast guard had two lines. the first one was for your physical exam and then your psychological exam and then if you pass that they told you to get into the other line for your eye exam. so he figured that would give him just enough time to slip the contact lenses into his eyes, which he did. the recruiter said, read the bottom line. he said, how far down? he said as far read retro so the sailor read. he said what you're reading? he said i'm reading the bottom line. he said, you are reading patent sentence so you clearly have the eyes of
bride. >> alisyn: modern science. >> clayton: welcome back to "fox & friends" this sunday and hope you're gearing up for a great christmas holiday and hope maybe you've gotten shopping done. and perhaps you haven't. we need to pay attention to this we've been talking throughout the show about the six gifts you should never give anyone, the gift that's all about me, like a photo of yourself or the book you hope you'll read because they're not going to read it. a pre gifting gift, also. >> trying to show off gift. >> aren't i cool. >> a gift that sends a message. >> like here is a gym membership. >> right. >> alisyn: so you shared with us, some of the worst gifts you've gotten and given. this is from michael in ohio, my wife wanted a storm door and like an idiot, i got her what i wanted, men are so stupid. >> clayton: michael, this is the problem, we're told we need to listen to our wives and women. >> alisyn: not when we say we want an appliance. and not when-- >> and a vacuum. when you say, honey, i want a vacuum. >> alisyn: not for christmas. a random day. >> and he goes out to target and buys y
them one by one disappear. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. arab heritage month celebration. (singing).
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)